Why you should – or shouldn’t – play Warhammer 40k in 2021

I’ve been out of the Warhammer game for over 15 years at the time of me writing this article. I have however continued reading the books, and tried to keep up to date with the lore – but being the massive universe that it is, it’s a challenge just to keep up with the basics.

When I found myself with some more free time between work, iI’d already decided on one thing I wanted to do – get back into Warhammer. 

Playing Warhammer when you’re a teen can be tricky. First of all, Warhammer can be a very expensive hobby to participate in – at least insofar as the tabletop miniature game goes. As a teen, you usually don’t have the financial means to collect, play or engage in the hobby to the extent that you might want to. This could be the reason why the game did not gain as much traction to become a mainstream IP until the last two decades which have now made it one of the biggest gaming franchises in history. 

As an adult, however, while you usually have the financial means, you may lack the time needed to fully invest yourself in your Warhammer hobby or have the required spaces to host the battles. When I started my hobby back up again, I knew I had to moderate my expectations. While I could buy all the models and supplies I wanted, I knew that it would take significant time to paint them to a standard I’d be satisfied with. A long project, as it were.

Still, despite it being a long project, I believe there are reasons why you as a gamer, as a hobbyist, a sci-fi/fantasy enthusiast, should want to play or engage in the massively interesting hobby that is Warhammer – and in this case, specifically, Warhammer 40k.

In this article, I’m going to plead my case if you will – and also mention some of the cons and arguments of why you maybe would want to consider not getting into the hobby.

The game

Warhammer/Warhammer 40k is a miniatures war game that’s mainly aimed at a demographic of 15-50 years old – most of them male though their big boom in the late 80\s and early 90’s saw it grow in popularity with younger players as well, as young as 12-13 in some instances. The company that makes the game, Games Workshop, was founded 40 years ago in the UK and has since then become a company valued in the billions. While other toy companies are failing, and people are losing interest in many physical toys as opposed to digital ones, Warhammer and Warhammer 40k is thriving in ways it never has before. Aside from an resurgence in tabletop/classic gaming overall, Warhammer is thriving even more and growing its fanbase.

How can this be?

1. The Setting/Universe & Peripheral lore products

The detailed setting of, in particular, Warhammer 40,000 is a rich setting filled with literally hundreds of novels/books, and tens of thousands of hours worth of lore, content, artwork, audiobooks, and products to feast on. The Warhammer 40,000 universe makes almost every other setting appear underdeveloped by comparison. Star Trek is a joke when holding the details and attention paid to the universe Games Workshop have nurtured for decades. Star Wars may be fleshed out well in some ways – if you include comics and novels – but Warhammer dwarves their catalogue. Dungeons & Dragons isn’t a setting in itself, and Warhammer 40k easily eclipses popular settings like Faerûn and Eberron. The Warhammer 40,000 lore is bigger than Star Trek and Star Wars combined. 

Top 10: The largest and coolest Warhammer miniatures - Geek Indeed

I’ll go so far as to say that no setting is as well-fleshed out as is Warhammer 40,000 (just my opinion, crucify me in the comments if you must!). While Warhammer fantasy (or AoC) has a well-thought-out setting, the background pales next to what exists for 40,000, which is one of the reasons you find more people leaning towards 40k rather than AoC. That, and how Space Marines have always appeared cooler to boys and were designed and marketed in that way.

The backstory and lore is rich, and it’s easy to get caught up in it – at least how I see it. The peripheral lore, books, and settings that go with it make it one of the deepest settings in existence, in my opinion. Certain settings aren’t that interesting to get into if you’re not engaged in the playing of the game but nonetheless the settings are there. In my opinion, the Warhammer 40,000 universe by itself is good enough to captivate, even if you don’t play the miniature game with its dystopian and dark futuristic narrative.

2. The models

How the models look is a big part of the success of the game – and the fact that the company employs, and holds a competition for master miniature painters to achieve results like above, and showing players what they could do, is a big part of the popularity of the game and why it has maintained a steady player base.

3. More than a game – Games Workshop knows its stuff

Do it the way you want to.

Warhammer 40,000 is:

  • A miniatures game.
  • A tournament game
  • A painting/collecting hobby
  • Books/Audiobooks/Comics
  • Computer games

The fact is, Games Workshop has done a masterful job of creating what is essentially crack for the middle-class nerd with disposable income, and a hobby that younger nerds look to and may want to play or just awe at in store displays. It hasn’t always been this way for the company –  over a decade ago, it was in a slump and it seemed doubtful whether the business would survive or not. 

However, leadership adjusted, the company grew, invested, and expanded, and now we’re looking at a company that essentially “owns” both its setting rights, the production supply of miniatures, the books and everything having to do with Warhammer itself.

And they’re executing their plan to get people involved in a masterful way while making impressive profits.

These, I believe, are some of the main reasons why Warhammer is so successful. 

However, why should you play the game? Why should you get into, or take an interest in the massive setting that is Warhammer? Here, I’m going to be talking mainly about the miniatures game – but many of the arguments can be used for the books or peripheral products as well.

Let’s take things point by point – Why you should play Warhammer.

1. Increases Attention Span & decision-making skills, patience, and Fine motor skills

2016's Miniature of Year - Warhammer Community

Working with Warhammer miniatures can be a mundane and grueling task to some. The detail required in assembling and painting the things will test your patience, fine motor skills, and attention span. Good results here will depend on your ability to handle both fine tasks, and repetitive tasks – any of these things are valuable skills both inside Warhammer 40k  and in the real world. This point is of course not unique to WH40k, but other miniature games may not have the same combination of media, or the wealth that Warhammer offers to players. 

Simply working with the miniatures and doing your best to assemble and prepare them in a way that’s attractive will improve the skills you have.

2. Actual practice of skills, such as math

What is Mathematics? | Live Science

Actually playing with the figures will require different skill sets. The measuring, memorization, and the sheer amount of rules to remember, dice rolls in the dozens, and to quickly crunch relatively simple algebra will still offer opportunities to improve such skills while playing a game. This differs markedly from playing the same game online or digitally, which to me is a huge bonus.

Depending on what level you play the game – everything from casual to tournaments – it will tax different levels of your strategic thinking and other, related skills, all of which are transferrable to the real world as well. In the end, playing a game like Warhammer brings with it many of the same boons we see in playing sports (although the physical exercise won’t be all that significant here).

For this reason alone, it could be an argument to play strategic board games, even if you don’t play Warhammer.

3. A community spanning several age groups/categories and exists in most places

Home - Warhammer Community

Few communities for board and miniature games rival that of Warhammer. The community is global, with clubs even in mid-sized towns, and the hobby popular in many European countries and the US. You’ll usually (outside of Covid-19) have a relatively easy time finding people to enjoy your hobby with. 

What’s more, these people will typically be of all ages and many different backgrounds. Now being nearly 40 years old, many of the people who began playing are in their 40’s or 50’s now, with many of them still playing the game to some extent. It’s always a great hobby, and a great outlet, when people of all age groups can enjoy the same hobby and get together in the same setting. 

Overall, the community which can bring people together is another reason in favor of Warhammer. 

4. An artistic hobby & creative outlet

Creative Assembly får Warhammer-licens. Spännande! | Feber / Spel

Obviously, working with Warhammer will cater to your creative side. The painting, the modeling, the building of your army – all of it works to encourage your fantasy and imagination. You can play the way you want, model your army the way you want. The rules even have support for creating your own specialized army setups, and the company actively works with you if you want to customize your models further, providing details and tools for you to do so.

Warhammer is like lego for adults – your imagination, not much else, sets the limitations here.

5. A non-digital hobby in a digital age

In an ever-increasing digital age with our children and friends spending more and more time in front of screens, I view it as important to encourage hobbies that take us away from the digital world and the screens. While parts of Warhammer can be made easier through the use of modern technology, it is the low tech of the board game that I find appealing here. 

I believe it crucial that we spend more time with each other – not through screens and digital media, but around a table, or in groups, engaging in socializing, games, thinking, and just plain fun. Warhammer is a hobby that offers all of these things and offers it to all demographics and categories of people. 

6. It’s just fun.

Space Marines Showcase: Darcy's Imperial Fists - Warhammer Community

Playing the game is just plain fun. I play an Imperial Fist army in the 40k universe and setting my majestic, sun-yellow warriors of terra against a Xenos horde or the traitor Astartes is always a fun time. Strategizing and trying to outthink, outflank and use my resources better than my opponent. Cheering the dice rolls when they go my way, and cursing them when they do not. Build amazing battlefields that we can play, and enjoy.

All of it is great fun – and this is the main reason the game should be played and enjoyed. A hobby that wasn’t fun, or this much fun, I would spend neither the time nor the money on.

7. You will be constantly challenged

Review Roundup – Imperial Fists, Salamanders and Aeldari – Goonhammer

You can expect a constant challenge when playing Warhammer. The rulebook alone is several hundred pages long, and scenarios will always bring up questions regarding situations, or how to interpret the rules or how to make something as fun as possible. This is not even mentioning the challenge you will find yourself in if you start looking at tournament play, which is of course an entirely different ballgame. 

I myself haven’t always enjoyed being challenged – but everything from the assembling and painting to the playing is a challenging endeavor with Warhammer and in a very good way. That’s also a reason why I find playing Warhammer to be worth my time. 

The flip side

Like with any hobby, there are downsides to Warhammer as well. It wouldn’t be a balanced nor even an attempt at an objective piece without getting into the cons of the game, and the hobby. 

I’m going to keep it simple here, however, as I really believe it is a quite simple side of cons.

There are two main reasons why you should consider not getting into at least the miniatures side of the game. 

1. The cost

Games Workshop has made certain that if you want to play Warhammer, they’ll get your money somehow. It doesn’t really matter to what extent – if you want the miniatures, the paints and supplies, the books, the peripheral products, everything is priced accordingly and for many can add up to a kings ransom for something which is designed to get you hooked. Warhammer is miniatures war game and your units determine the strength and scope of your attacks and nobody wants to be the guy who shows up with 4 infantry men against an armored cavalry. 

While the company has of course spent billions (likely) to perfect its manufacturing techniques, it does hurt to pay $80 for less than a pound of plastic pieces that come in the shape of a space marine chapter master. 

40K: Mortarion Unboxing - Bell of Lost Souls
Games Workshop Webstore

Even the main troops aren’t exactly cheap. Running a 1000 point army will quickly push the price tag above $200. Include the supplies you need for painting, and if you want the company’s paints, that bill goes above $400. With rulebooks, sets of things that you, strictly speaking, do need to enjoy the game, very few people can properly start the hobby below $500.

Most spend far, far more.

To some, and certainly to most kids, this is prohibitively expensive. There are of course ways to cut the costs through package deals and similar things, but the fact is – this stuff looks good, and it costs even more. The end results may be very impressive, but getting there will take heavy, bloody chunks out of your wallet. 

Don’t listen to anyone telling you that you can start “on the cheap”. Warhammer is an expensive hobby, and if you get into it, you’ll find yourself either spending a lot of money or cursing yourself that you don’t have the money to spend.

2. The time dedication

Secondly, Warhammer takes time. This is less of a problem for many people, but it may be a problem to some. Not everyone has the time to spend dozens and hours (and it will take dozens) to prepare an entire army. The games usually take between 2-4 hours depending on size, which is something that for many people still can be handled – but you do need to realize that the game will take some of your time if you get into it – and if you decide that you like it, it’ll take a lot of time.

Therefore, the ideal player for Warhammer that I see, is someone with a decent job, some disposable income, and plenty of time on their hands. That’s a slim group, so most of us have to make do with some shortcoming in this list – but it’s usually something that we can work around.

3. The Nature of Miniatures Game

With more alternatives Games Workshop has managed to adapt to the industry but it is not the miniatures alone that are lining their koffers, moreso it is the IP which has been licensed out for anything from mobiles games to remastered pc games. Miniature games are focused on collecting units and going to war with your opponent and mobile pvp can provide that for far less of a time and money invesment.

There is no story to speak of as you are in a skirmish or conflict opposed to a campaign where you see narratives and plotlines unfold. You do not level up rather you buy stronger units and this mode of play is not for everyone especially if you are the kind of person who dislikes pay to play games or do not have the time and resources. Miniature games are linear and are a time investment when playing similar to tabletop rpgs but whereas D&D is a social, cooperative and collaborative experience Warhammer on the other hand is competitive and does not have as many players.

In the end, nothing should really stop you from enjoying the hobby if it’s something you find that’s to your liking other than finances.

To play or not to play Warhammer? I see it as an easy choice, at least for myself. I love the game, I love the setting, I love the lore, I have a great job and I’ll be playing and enjoying the game for many years to come.

I hope to see you around, fielding your own armies, and that we will meet in joyous battle (or alliance) one day.

Witch of Salem : Fun for 4 with a great theme [Board Game Review]

Mykal discusses one of his go to Horror tabletop games with Halloween coming up, maybe your group would enjoy Witch of Salem.

I first came across Witch of Salem (Mayfair Games ) designed by Michael Reineck (Pillars of Earth, Cuba: El Presidente) whilst watching a Dice Tower Top 10 with Tom Vassel and his buddies. I was searching for a coop board game with a good theme that did not take too long to set up and play yet still was interesting enough to my group that we play it again. Off the rip I liked the Cthulhu mythos with the it being the early 20th Century New England involving ancient ones, demons and intrigue.

My initial fears after playing Arkham Horror and Eldritch Horror (Fantasy Flight) was that I would pay a lot of money for a game that the group would not play enough to warrant its price. An issue for many people entering the hobby of board games especially those who intend to collect is the price on some of the best games are pretty steep, add in postage you are looking at a hefty some of cash for something you won’t get to use that offten. I have paid for games that I only ever got to play once and wished I could have got another honest opinion on the game before buying it. Board Game Geek did not have it scored too high (6.6) yet what I could read the game seemed straight forward, challenging and did have a tone of play that matched the theme.

The game’s designer Michael Reineck is a German designer who was nominated in 2008 for Designer of the Year, the year Witch of Salem was released along with some of his other projects. I could not find a website or social media page to dig up some more info but he has worked on more than 6 published board games and the list is nothing to sneeze at. The artwork (Franz Vohwinkel) even when looking at reviews seemed interesting as it did in Dragons Lair when I went to purchase it.The artwork looks great from the box to the cards to the map you play on with the right dark tones to bring the setting to life.

witch of salem spread 2

The box contains all your standard board game pieces, tokens, cards and a board with a manual to read which could have been streamlined a little more but was easy enough to comprehend. The game is limited to 4 players max and is a cooperative game involving strategy and combat. Not really a mystery game despite the description on the front of the box but the horror theme and the the progression mechanics are easy to use and build tension as time passes in the game.

This is a fun game and is pretty simple to learn after one playthrough. That being said, Witch of Salem is not an easy game and scales well for a maximum of 4 players. There are a variety of ancient ones you can find yourself grappling with as the time mechanics don’t seem to stress the players more rather keep the tension and pace consistent. Towards the end you and your players will have to come together to seal the gates and prevent the demons from entering our world. This is something you can play for a while as games seldom feel the same and it is great for a halloween board game before the movies or after dinner. I recommend this over Eldrith and Arkham as it plays faster, is taught easier and the price is fair considering what you get out of it. If you want something that will have you on the edge of your seat for most of the game and don’t want a million things to set up Witch of Salem is the horror coop game for you.

 

Rating: 8 out 10

I gave it a lower score because I feel that the game could be fun with more players and there were no expansions released. The rules are not as straight forward and all of the characters are the same with no significant diffirences in skills and abilities.

What are TRPGs and why do we quest? Why we think you might like them too.

By Mykal K Grimm

If you are new to role playing games then I hope this piece will shed some light on the hobby and help further your interest in this truly enjoyable form of social entertainment. Table Top Role Playing Games are not like other games the majority of your friends might play when they hangout in their free time as it has a heavy reliance on the players imagination and it is narrative driven, a story is unfolding throughout play and you can change the course of events by decisions taken by the player. The dice have more than 6 sides or less depending on which ones are needed to be rolled and the game is not competitive in the sense that there is a winner and looser at the end. The game also lasts longer than most traditional board or card games and is played in a way that most people have not encountered as it is vastly different to Uno, Chess or Poker. We will go deeper into the mechanics at another time but it is a very different game that offers a truly unique and fun experience for the players and game masters. I will do my best to help explain what it is we do around the table and why I enjoy it and think more people would if they tried to play TRPGs.

Role Playing Games are games in which the player takes on the role of a character of a certain class and race in often a fictional setting where they are given a quest to resolve. When generating this character you roll or calculate Points for your ability score and distribute them among your skills and attributes which is done during the character creation phase. Different classes possess different talents and abilities as do races which can include dim light vision if you were an Elf or resistance to poison if you were an Orc shaman. Classes can range from the combat focused Fighter to the versatile Wizard and Elves, Dwarves and Halflings are but some of the playable races and classes in some of these systems.  These tabletop games are not merely restricted to medieval fantasy settings but those are the ones I prefer and will use them for most of my examples.

Games can be set in any era, in any environment and classes and powers vary from system to system as do the rules of play.  Mutants and Masterminds is an RPG system which sees you take on the role of a super hero or villain and battle it out Marvel style while Call of Cthulhu has the players play as Investigators trying to solve a murder before dying or loosing their collective s##t in the process. Some RPGs require a  gaming surface and miniature figurines for staging combat, others may use index cards to tell a story while some do not require anything but a piece of paper and is entirely spoken. RPGs come in many forms , levels of complexity and have actually been around since the 70’s with  Dungeons & Dragons being the first leading name in the industry and remains so until today.

Gary Gyax and Dave Arneson were enthusiastic war gamers who wanted to create a game in which you controlled a single soldier opposed to an entire unit or platoon. They would eventually brainstorm a very basic Dungeons & Dragons system and later Gary Gygax would publish it through his company TSR. D&D would change the face of gaming forever as many video game developers would use the character stats from their game to develop and design their own games with them serving as a template. In time their brand would have bestsellers popularizing the genre of fantasy further and familiarizing the reader with their RPG settings and lore. They would push the envelope for the entire industry while creating it at the same time. Fantasy was the first setting but later they would release futuristic science fiction settings in Gamma World  and other books including D20 Modern where players could use SMGs and helicopters. The whole idea was to give players a chance to enter their imaginations and with their guidelines play out epic adventures all from the safety of their own home and in the company of their friends.

Me and my guild first really got into RPGing because we all enjoyed similar things and for most of us, none of us had a chance to really play an TRPG. We would come together and after long discussions about D&D we decided to give it a shot and start playing. At first most of us were brand new to Dungeons & Dragons TRPG games but we enjoyed reading the books, seeing the great artwork. We did start with a more complex system (3.5 Edition which later evolved into Pathfinder) that did have many stats, numbers, reading and may not have been the best choice for newbies in hindsight. The learning curve is not as steep as it may appear at first glance but it does require reading the material in order to have a basic grasp of how it the game is played. Coming to the gaming table without reading anything is a mistake. With the resources available online today a new player can get a decent idea of what the game is about and a basic comprehension of stages of play and how a turn goes. We ourselves plan to put out tutorial videos down the line.

In the beginning your eyes will be overwhelmed with many of the Character sheets but after a few gaming sessions you will know what to look for and where what goes. With every session we ran we would feel more comfortable with the rules, questions would get addressed and answered and the deeper we delved into this imaginary world. My first character was Marcus Marvella, a Half Elf Ranger with a cliche backstory and I remember how much I like attributes of the class. My brother player a more advanced class of a War Mage, Boris of the Bash Bros was a Human Barbarian and Medeni played a dwarven cleric. All of us enjoyed figuring out which skills and weapons to use depending on the situation they found themselves. We learned very fast that there was a big coop component to playing the game, communication and teamwork is the only way to survive an attack or escape a potentially fatal argument. We also grew closer as friends and before long we are snapping D&D puns and jokes and it was something we all would continue to look forward to until this day.

When you quest you are playing a character other than yourself in a fictional setting where you are not bound by our current reality and norms. Want to slay dragons and rescue the princess, you can do it from the safety of your home with your friends as your allies. Ever wanted to be part of a story as it was written? Solve mysteries in a Victorian city or escape the Death Star with you friends, yes and yes guys. Questing is always going to have more options than any video game because there is no limit to your imagination. Many have described the RPG experience as the players are characters in movie and are playing it out as the Game Master is the director responsible for crafting the obstacles and supporting cast. I cannot describe the laughs had at the table and the tension when the Health Points were low and nobody had any potions and our Cleric was out of heals! The immersion is a big part of why I enjoy playing and running the game. No one session is the same and if done right a session involves just as much role playing as combat encounters.

The community of tabletop RPG players is diverse and the passion for the hobby is very real. There are dozens of groups and pages on social media and websites (cough) including Nerd Dimension who seek to make this hobby more accessible and make it easier for those wishing to pursue it as a hobby. RPGing can be a truly liberating experience, being able to break away from the problems in the real world and it can also be very social if you schedule games with new players once in a while. I hope that this post can help motivate readers to consider playing or maybe return to it now as there are so much more options now. Reach out to members in local gaming groups or go to game shops and see if there other players who need an extra player. The experience can be rewarding and it is better than solitary gaming in my opinion. At the end of every session I feel I did not waste my time, I was socializing while playing a game by telling a story. I do not have the same feeling after playing 4 hours of a PC game or console and my eyes get tired.

If you love playing RPG PC or video games, this is something you should at least look into to get some insight into how your pass time originated. I have noticed it seems harsher for video game players crossing over but there are systems that let you do awesome stuff in the early levels so don’t worry about being bored.

If you love fantasy fiction then I cannot recommend this enough for it is the closest I have gotten to playing a character from one of my favorite novels and immersing myself into a setting. It could also serve as a helpful tool to flush out your own settings and characters if you group are open to trying it out.

If you are looking for something different that could sharpen your writing, voice acting or social skills in general than this is something that could be beneficial to you.

 

Game Systems I can recommend for new players:

GURPS : A very basic system which is good for a first session as there is less attributes and a basic rule system. A great way to introduce basic character creation and principles of play found in the more complex systems especially for younger players. There are many itirations of the system with loads of settings to choose from and is the cheapest to get price ways compared to the bigger systems.

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (2nd Edition): A step up in complexity but still easier than the later editions and other RPGs on the market. Despite having more rules than GURPS the AD&D system allows for more options in play and character creation. Good starting point if you have a group thinking of playing D&D the amount of materials and campaigns online to me make this the most fun to run and play for new players from teens to adults. Our very own DM Pat still runs the system until this day and you can catch him on Roll20 running sessions.

Shadowrun: A science-fiction / cyber punkish game which is more focused on skills opposed to class for solving problems and resolving combat. It is a more modern setting and is rich in theme and flavor and serves an interesting alternative to players not looking for Swords and Sorcery. The weapons and races are just as diverse as you can find in most fantasy and the twist of entery this ‘Matrix’ like cyber dimension makes for a unique experience. You have hackers to tanks and working together while one of your runners is disabling a security program is pretty cool. If you want to get a feel for the general idea of the game you can get the Shadowrun PC games for fair prices on GOG and I recommend them.

Call of Cthulhu: A horror science-fiction RPG based on the HP Lovecraft’s Mythos in which you investigate mysterious events and have to maintain your sanity and safety as the Ancient Ones hurl every demonic thing it can at your party. The basic role playing rules make it easy to get into for new players and the horror setting will have players on the edge of their seats until the very end where everyone dies…because it is very very very hard to survive in COC. A must play for all horror and Lovecraft fans thinking of entering the RPG realm.

Star Wars Roleplaying Game: What more can I say. This game was designed to be easy for those taking their first steps into roleplaying games and the theme is there in buckets. It is new and you can buy beginner boxes for cheap and I think this goes over well with younger players the most. Unleash the force with your buddies while recapturing some of the magic of the movies.

Vampire: The Masquerade :  A system unlike the others which is more story orientated opposed to combat. The system has a strong community and following is designed with those looking for more storytelling in the game and the setting and theme of vampires is very well done. Take on the curse of the night in the form of unique vampires as you and your party have to decide how to operate in this hidden world. There is a great PC game developed by Troika of this system which I recommend.

There is something for everybody in the world of tabletop RPGs and maybe this post helps somebody choose to give them a shot. Until your eyes gaze upon my humble writing once more please let us know what you think of our content in the comments section below. If you like what you read so far we welcome you to subscribe and follow our social media pages and podcast.

*Nerd Dimension also have started recruiting members and players for our Sci Fi Fantasy Club in Kungsbacka, all you need is the app Meet Up to find and get in touch with the group.

Pathfinder: Game Mastery Guide (Pocket Edition) Review (Tabletop RPG)

Mike reviews his pocket edition of Paizo’s Game Mastery Guide. Is it worth the money and space saved?

Paizo is a company that means a lot to tabletop RPG if for nothing else for making the best use of the OGL and using their pioneering spirit to change the landscape of gaming. Paizo took a system that I myself loved which was 3.5 Dungeons & Dragons and later expanded and streamlined certain things allowing for truly an individual experience for role players. The system built upon yet kept key elements and mechanics such as alignment, attack opportunities and the feat system which made for a plethora of customization and a feeling that you were in control of your character with no character in the party really feeling or playing alike. I hope to provide more in depth articles and posts about Paizo and their contribution to the industry so plesae subscribe to Nerd Dimension.

Sure, D&D 5th Edition is a system onto itself and I give it credit and maximal respect for making a smoother system for new players and recapturing another generation with the bug that is tabletop role playing. However, as someone who enjoys Pathfinder and is not a fan of math I still managed to get used to it and with a little effort was GMing long sessions and my party never complained after the first few combats. Not to say I myself have not enjoyed 5th Edition but I find myself missing the tons of source books available for 3.5 with the simple conversion and the vast library that Pathfinder itself provided. I will recommend that anyone just getting into role playing games should start with 5th edition as it is a less complex system with more focus on the role play aspects of the game with a simpler rules set while being far more streamlined for newcomers. 

When returning and launching my group back in Stockholm I could not afford to buy too many books as I had digital copies of the core book and a few supplements so I opted to buy Bestiary 1, Advanced Classes and the Game Masters Guide with a GM Screen. My thinking behind the decision was also the space and weight both on the table and to carry around as I was actively looking for new players and venues to play. Having a portable set up for Pathfinder didn’t require much more than my Ipad 2 and the books which all fit in a backpack along with the stationary, battlemat, dice and miniatures. Subscribe to read our GM load out in the GMs Chamber that me and Bakar will put together if you are curious about stepping your game mastery up notch or two.

The book is great and the print was not as small as I feared it would be but I do not require the aid of spectacles just yet but some of my players who do wear glasses were a little irritated by this. The book has everything that the bigger book has just in a smaller print so I cannot complain about the quality or of any errors in printing that I came across using the book. I am a fan of the artwork and style used by Paizo through out Pathfinder and Pathfinder Society and it looked good in Kingmaker. I can say that I feel that Pathfinder did a good job concerning how the spread their information in their smaller books and it scaled well. I can say that the smaller size allowed me to take two books with me to work and spend lunch putting post its on pages I knew I would be referring to that were not on the screen. It was did make my backpack a little lighter so I can say I am a satisfied customer and that Paizo delivered.

Now with Pathfinder Second Edition officially out I am eagerly awaiting to hear the experience of players and GMs alike concerning the new mechanics and how it compares of the original Pathfinder.

 

Game Mastery Guide
My copy of Pathfinder’s Game Mastery Guide

Lamentations of the Flame Princess: a review of the game system

Lamentations of the Flame Princess: a review of the game system

By Bronze oldie

I was asked to review Lamentations of the Flame Princess as a game system. In case you are not familiar with this, Lamentations of the Flame Princess (LotFP) is a game company that pulls no punches and is publishing some of the highest quality and innovative RPG material on the market today. The quality of the art and the way that the books are put together is amazing. It’s very surprising to me that LotFP  is able to  get such high quality artists, when Wizards of the Coast, with backing of the Mighty Hasbro corporation, who have the ability to outbid everyone else, produces such comparatively inferior art for their games. 

LotFP publishes a wide variety of modules and game supplements. Some of them, like Carcosa or A Red and Pleasant Land are game worlds. Some are modules that you can easily plop down into the middle of a regular D&D campaign. But most of the books take place in a game world that resembles 17th Century Earth: the time of the English Civil War, the 30 years war, and Pirates of the Caribbean.

But at one point, the decision was made to make a game system to go with the books. It was originally released as box set with a players handbook, a referee’s guide, a module (Tower of the Star Gazer) and a book on how to play a RPG for people who have never done that. Since then, the players handbook: Rules & Magic has been updated. It’s available for free without the art. But the paid version without the art is much better. On the other hand, this is a game for adults, and the art reflects this. You might not want to give the book to a child if you have not seen it yet.

Looking through the book, it is mostly a clone of TSR version of D&D that is closest to the B/X version of the game. 21st century players are used to each edition of D&D being radically different from the previous version. But the TSR versions were more alike, similar to the way that 3.0, 3.5 and Pathfinder are similar. There were slight variations between TSR versions of D&D. The worse Armor Class was 10 in some versions and 9 in others. But Chainmail was AC:5 is all versions and Plate mail+Shield was AC: 2 in all versions. LotFP is very familiar to players of TSR D&D, with only a few, but significant changes. It has the same seven classes that go back to the original version of D&D. (Cleric, Fighter, Magic User, Thief, Dwarf, Elf and Halfling) Skills are rolled on a d6 instead of a % as TSR does or a d20 as 3+ editions do. The Weapons available have a few things that are spelled out, and all others are grouped according to their size.

But the biggest difference in LotFP is that the classes are more separated. Every Class is the best at something: Fighters are best at roll-to-hit, Specialists (Thieves) are best at using skills, Dwarfs have the most Hit Points. Halflings are best at Saving Throws, missile weapons, and Hiding in the wilderness. And the Magic of Clerics and Magi are completely separated. With only Dispel Magic on both spell lists. Also, the get-out-of-jail spells have been removed from the list. (Raise Dead, Resurrection, limited Wish, Wish) also, the damage dealing spells have been removed (Fireball, Lightning Bolt, Cone of Cold) leaving Magic Missile as the “go to” spell for dealing damage (which has been increased to 1d4 per level) And there are some interesting new spells. The combined effect of these changes are to make Magic dangerous and scary. And a recent book: Vaginas Are Magic, introduced a new rule that made 9th level spells potentially available to a 1st Level character.

However, the LotFP rules can sometimes confound player expectations if they have played D&D. For example: Starting in Original D&D and throughout all the boxed sets, Halflings were always a variant of Fighter. But starting with (1st ed) AD&D and on through all the later versions of the game, Halflings were strongly encouraged to be Thieves. In LotFP, Halflings are more like the 2-5th editions’ Ranger.

And players who are used to using the rules to defeat the monster instead of role playing, who are used to Feats and Skills for all classes, won’t like the simplicity of the the LotFP system. 

There are some who think that LotFP is more dangerous than other games. And it is more dangerous than the 3-5 edition games that Wiz-bro puts out. But it’s not any more dangerous than the TSR versions of the game. The big difference is that in the TSR versions of D&D, your character could at any moment be chopped up by and axe-wielding Orc. In LotFP, your character might be pulled away to the home plane of the eldritch abomination that you Summoned and failed to take control of.

Nerd Dimension TOS Ep 2 with guest David

They return !

The nerds return with another throwback installment in which we tackle many issues and of course go overboard with our sound effects and trolling. Apart from giving listeners our opinions on the listed below we through in our specific brand of humor as to offend only the most sensitive of listeners. We try to not make time sensitive content so that you will never feel like you are keeping up with a trend or listening to another pod-casting reviewing the newest products. By not having sponsors we have the liberty of talking about what we want, the way we want and pick and chose topics we feel may not have been discussed enough or from our position. In between day jobs, shows and other day to day BS we have to deal with we gotta vent somewhere about the shit we love so enjoy as we talk about:

– D&D Shadow Plague (Comic Review)
– Fairy Tale Fights Review (Xbox 360)
– Shadows  Over Camelot (Board Game Review)
– Book Recommendations
–  Apollo still hating on flat chested actresses portraying Wonder Woman !

And of course over the top sound effects !!!

 

 

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7 Wonders (Board Game Review)

One of the most popular games out now makes the cut. Read more to see why we enjoyed this card drafter

I first saw this game being played at a convention and it seemed pretty interesting at a first glance. Building up wonders , I think five people were playing and the artwork really impressed me. It really looks like the developers and publishers had really put in some hard work. The different size cards and draw system intrigued me and the players seemed to really be having a blast. I was still kinda new to the drafting card game as a system but I liked how the game seemed to flow pretty fast despite all the players. I watched a few turns play out before grabbing a smoke break and talking to someone who had played it before where they broke down some of the core mechanics. At the time he mentioned how the expansions added more to the game and how he was surprised I had not come across it before. It seemed like something I would like to play, it had enough moving parts and flavor I thought to be something worth buying especially when you can play up to seven out the box. It is hard to find a board game that can scale well and I am always looking for games that can include more players as I rarely have the perfect numbers to run some of my other board games which often cap at 4 to 5.

Only a few months later I find myself playing the game with some friends after a dinner party and I was instantly sold on it. It did not take long to explain the rules and the beautiful artwork and colors added to theme. The owner of the game we played had it very well organized so the set up was pretty smooth and it just looked fun and the dinner table sat 6 comfortably so there was ample room for the guests. The system of play was new to me and the way you drew cards and point system made sure you had several ways of winning the game which several of the players found interesting along with the diplomacy and deal brokering that could occur between turns. The energy at the table felt like everyone was eager for the next turn and after a few turns the players stopped asking questions and kept things moving. Despite the game not being cooperative it did not really have us at each others throat and was not too rule heavy. This all added to the excitement and I decided that it would be something I purchase for my new group when I move to Sweden.  The game has been critically acclaimed since its original print in 2010 for Repos Production from Belgium. Designed by Antoine Bauza, a designer I was not to familiar with but he won the Game of the Year Award (Spel Des Jahres 2011) and apart from that I could not find much on him online.

When I walked into Dragons Lair and saw they had all the expansions I figured this was a game that has staying power and obviously is well supported by its publisher. Another thing that was an unofficial cosign was that several of the store’s customers I asked for opinions said the game was easy to learn and fun to play. In fact out of the four people I asked all four had played and had something nice to say about it. After reading more about what the expansions offered I immediately bought Leaders and the stand alone Duels so that I could play with my Girlfriend who was keen on the idea after already playing the basic Settlers of Catan game for boardgaming.

The first time we played we had 5 players and it took us in total two hours to run the first game but it was thoroughly enjoyable for everybody involved. The rules were pretty straight forward, the color coding of the cards you drew and their abilities made for some interesting back and forth across the table as players new to board games quickly got a hang for the mechanics. The time system makes sure the game does not last too long so the next few games were around an hour and some change. I do not see how someone could play it in under an hour with 5-7 players unless they all shared the same degree of experience in playing it.

7 Wonders plays like no other game I have played before, the artwork is brilliant and the the mechanics are really quick to learn even for the most novice of players. The game has replay value and just looks inviting once set up. If you are thinking of the next board game you want to buy for your group to play every once in a while that is not too intense 7 Wonders is what you should be looking for. What I really enjoyed was how the game forces you to consider and pay attention to what is happening around the table, meaning more interaction between players and a interest in what they did in their turn. It has enough strategy that my brother who is a stern strategy game player had a blast setting up resource cards and building up his forces.  There is something to building up an ancient civilization and constructing a wonder that is just awesome for the average history buff like Apollo.

The downside is that is that it is not a cheap game and the cards should be sleeved for repeat play. The thing about card heavy games is the constant shuffling and use results in wear and tear and 7 Wonders really looks too good that the aesthetics are a huge part of why you like the game. The sleeves just keep the game looking good for longer and saves your nerves when sticky fingers threaten smudge a card. That is where it gets a little tricky because the game is so popular and demand for those specific sleeves so high it is hard to find them in-stock at most online board game retailers. I have spoken to several clerks who have confirmed that the suppliers cannot ship enough and there are shortages in several countries. The sleeve size is not as common as the american board game or trading card game which does add to the problem. Apart from the money you have to invest the game does require a bigger playing surface to fully enjoy everything, much like Mare Nostrum, Twilight Imperium and any of the newer Dungeons and Dragons board games from Wizards of the Coast.

After discussing with my fellow Guild Members and Nerd Dimension crew we came to the decision conerning the score.

7 out of 10

Out the box the game is impressive, easy to learn and will have you coming back for more. Due to its simple and fun play mechanics even players new to the genre will easily master it. We took points off for the price point, space requirements and do feel that the expansions did fix some things to make the game more interesting through new options and the introduction of new mechanics. This game is worth the money and we suggest reading up on the expansions if you are a seasoned player looking to have more depth and flavor out the gate. 7 Wonders has done great and stood the test of time, we predict that the game will continue to dominate and is firmly in the position that few title can claim.

please be sure to leave your feedback in the comments bellow and subscribe so you can see our reviews of the expansions for 7 Wonders.

Marvel : Legendary Board Game Review – A coop deck builder for the newbs but does it deliver ?

Upper Decks smash is reviewed. Capes, Crime Fighters and Cards, lots and lots of cards !!!

This review was years in the making and I wanted to play through the game enough times before passing judgement on something I was excited about for so long. I was hyped about it when I first heard of the concept of a coop Marvel game, something to play with friends that was not miniatures on a board and had more possibilities. Granted I was not a deck-builder fan at the time but it sounded like something I could enjoy.  More importantly I wanted my group to have played a few hands to see how players of different levels of experience felt about it. A game with hundreds of cards and new mechanics may be fun for an avid gamer but a newbie might be overwhelmed by all the things they have to remember.

The game is pretty popular from the amount of expansions (11 at present) that  continue to be print and with Comic Culture and Nerd Culture being at an all time peak I felt something like a COOP deck builder required us to be able to give an accurate, fun and informative review. I saw a lot of Youtubers discussing it, lots of reviews but it was one of those games that was not so popular in Croatia so at the time of its release it did not get such a push I guess in the Eastern European markets. I digress. Nevertheless I was syked to play it after reading and hearing mixed reviews I still went in hoping for the best.  Upper Deck are not usually associated with board games as many of my peers recall them from sports trading cards and memorabilia so it had me curious to see how they would fair in this new realm. To clarify I would like to state that I was not big on deck builders or card games at the time so this was a recent purchase after I had played a few more card games .

Having new players and a bigger place meant I could get back to boardgaming and this is a game I felt I never quiet played enough of. The first time I played it was in Split with my close friends and guild brothers Boris aka Moses and Ivan aka the Apache in a small apartment an wound up playing it on the floor! So my first impression was that I needed space to run it. I recently played it at the new place with my girlfriend and fellow Nerd Dimensioners Apollo and Gustonius. I purchased the game at Dragons Lair in Kungsholmen Stockholm. The price did catch me a little off guard considering that it is not the newest title however the artwork on the box and the shape of it made for easy storage and display piece . Seeing the amount of expansions already available indicated to me that this game obviously is still selling well when so much added content is still being released.

The base game contains 500 cards in total, a gameboard and manual. Upper deck threw in a ton of free dividers so you can label all the heroes, villains, schemes etc as to make it easier the next time you play. WARNING ! This game will take time to prepare and explain and I suggest you play it with 3 before playing five. After you organize the infinity deck of cards you can build the decks which go on the board. The board is good quality and straightforward with authentic artwork. Upper Deck saw to it that the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier and reaming flavor added to the game. The manual is short and simple, big enough text and pretty easy to understand after you flipped through it.

LEGENDARY MIC FNL

Included is how to- run your very first game and other ways to run the villains so that you can easily setup the henchmen and masterminds. The mechanics involved players drawing from different decks to either build their own deck or to play their hands on the table. You combat bad guys by playing different shield cards which serve as a currency or attack points and your goal is to prevent bad guys from escaping and destroying the master minds. The game is not the easiest and you will be knocked around but it does balance out as you start taking villains off the board. The developers and designers created a beautiful game and made sure that each game will be different. The mechanics do take a couple of hands but you will know what you are doing after 3 games and will be able to explain to any new players you wish to include in the crime fighting fun.

After playing enough games I did start feeling that I was playing the mechanics more than I was fighting bad guys but in all fairness it is a deck-builder game not a classic boardgame. Luckily I had purchased the Deadpool Expansion which was not expensive and added more cards and made for some interesting combinations. This being a review of the base game I will say that despite have 500 cards the game did feel like it was more mechanics and it did not give me enough options to make it more of a game that I could play say twice a month. 7 Wonders does this well where you get enough flavor and options out the box and it gets people back to the table because it is engaging despite being a competitive game. When I purchased the Dark City expansion I saw that it allowed for more options and added mechanics which did make the game harder but in return the scales did tip back in the players favor with better cards and characters. The base game should have included a few more things and with the price tag I would have preferred a mat instead of a board for conveniences sake.

All in all Marvel did deliver a fun deck-builder that you can teach kids and adults could still enjoy as it has moments where it does feel a little pokerish yet maintains a very enjoyable team aspect. Working together, letting the next player get a certain hero so they can deliver a harder hit. It does have a competitive option where you count up the amount of damage done and cards in your deck to determine who earned the most points which also can spice it up. This is a game which needs sleeves and expansions so be prepared to dish out some coin for it if you want to truly be able to enjoy the game. The cards will get worn out and the expansions keep you and your players more interested. As a stand alone it can prove fun for a regular group but is not something we recommend for smaller groups as we feel it plays best at 4-5 players.

The Nerd Dimension will give this game a

 

6.7 out of 10

 

*Ruling: Despite the great artwork the game is a considerable investment for a game that will not have the same feeling after 20 games. The mechanics can be mastered but for new players it can take a couple of games.The Legendary system has been applied to everything from Buffy to Aliens so it is not that the system is bad but I felt there would be more flavor in the base game. However the rating jumps higher when you add the expansions so subscribe to see which ones we liked and which ones we felt did not add much.

 

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Citadels + Dark City Exp (Boardgame Review) G.O.L.T.

 

The weather has been foul the past couple of weeks in Split and a few of the guild members had not seen tabletop in action in quite some time. The once regular Dungeons & Dragons game fell apart due to unforeseeable circumstances so the G.O.L.T. was on hard times. I can speak as a DM it hurt watching dust accumulate on my books, missing the sound of dice hitting the table and watching players squirm. Good times. Thankfully this changed recently thanks to Lil Joey and the senior guild members.

An office space belonging to a relative of Joey’s was being renovated and he had time to use it prior to the work starting. The boy notified the guild and a session was booked. This is a review as much as it is an article because the first purchase of the guild of 2016 was Citadels. After seeing several reviews and playing the game myself over the holidays with my girlfriend I grew fond of its mechanics to it immediately. I was surprised I had not heard of it before and proposed it to the guild that we consider getting it for our game bank. After a short vote we managed to buy the last one from Carta Magica Split. Not long afterwards I tested the game with a few members but it was not until a couple of weeks ago we played it in its entirety with 6 of us.

Citadels

Citadels is a card game of bluffing, diplomacy, intrigue and plays up to 8 players with the Dark City Expansion (which is standard with the 3rd Edition) and was designed by Bruno Faidutti whose last game priror to designing it was was Mystery of the Abbey. The box contains everything you need to start playing and fits in snug, the box itself is small so carrying it around is not going to be a problem for anyone choosing to purchase it. The one thing is I would stress to anyone looking to buy Citadels is to be sleeves for all the cards because they will get worn out fast after playing regularly.

In short in the game a player takes on the role of a city builder and the point of the game is to have the most valuable structures and total points at the end of the game. The game ends when the 8th district is built and upon the final players turn you tally up the scores. This card game which also has strategy involved is why it can be fun even for non gamers but the luck factor also comes in so one game can truly be hectic if you keep drawing bad cards. Character cards are numbered 1-8 (9 if you are playing 8) and the order of play starts at 1 every hand or next number. At the end of every round of play the character deck is reshuffled and the characters vary from the Assassin who plays first can kill characters while the Warlord can destroy any district card except for the Bishop’s whose lands are protected. No one character is overpowered and you can really mix it up by including the expansion district cards and characters. The box says that the game can take up to half an hour but in all honesty I am yet to play a game under an hour and that is with only 1 new player but unlike most cards games this one is engaging and you always have something to do.  The artwork in the manual and cards is interesting and the gold tokens look decent though I would have loved more of them because we at certain times had nothing in bank and that was with only 6 players so Fantasy Flight should step their game up but u can always play with other tokens.

cit session 1

Citadels is a very fun game to play and I was skeptical that a card game could be so intense but I have witnessed cards fly across rooms and tokens roll off tables after someone gets robbed for the third straight round. This is not a game if you want something quick paced and short because there is thinking and you have to pay attention to who is building what and anticipate who they may be. The mind games run a muck especially once you really get the hand of all the cards and the expansion cards truly make the game that much more interesting. The game cost 250 Croatian Kunas and it has the expansion built in and the only other investment you would have to make is getting sleeves for the cards to enjoy the game forever 🙂 This game has a high play-ability rate but because it is a card game which is competitive so don’t expect much depth while throwing down cards and pissing off your neighboring players. A game that is fun to play, relatively cheap to buy just don’t expect this to be your go to game and its not something you can play more than twice in one setting but the positive is that it is something you can do while having beers and still have a chat without missing too much.

Until next time, don’t touch my board with greasy hands, don’t include monopoly as a board and never never EVER let a bro blow on ya dice.

The numbers (out of 5 *):

Price: **** (4)

Playability: **** (4)

Build: **** (4)

Design: ***** (5)

 

Where you can buy it:

CARTA MAGICA SPLIT ( 5% DISCOUNT IF YOU SING UP AS A MEMBER)

SPEIL OFFENSIVE (Deliver to most European Nations with varied discounts)

BOARD GAME GURU  (UK based store with affordable prices)

 

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